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Trends
7/20/2017 12:00 AM
WASHINGTON, D.C. — If you’ve noticed a shift in your traditional-aged students’ behaviors and expectations in the last couple of years, that’s because you’re seeing Generation Z arrive on campus. The first students from this generation started as freshmen in 2013, said Corey Seemiller, assistant professor of leadership studies at Wright State University; and Meghan Grace, new member orientation director for Sigma Phi Epsilon.
WASHINGTON, D.C. — If you’ve noticed a shift in your traditional-aged students’ behaviors and expectations in the last couple of years, that’s because you’re seeing Generation Z arrive on campus. The first students from this generation started as freshmen in 2013, said Corey Seemiller, assistant professor of leadership studies at Wright State University; and Meghan Grace, new member orientation director for Sigma Phi Epsilon. Seemiller and Grace, the authors of Generation Z Goes to College, spoke at the Association of American Colleges and Universities annual meeting.

Generation Z’s members were born between 1995 and 2010, they said. But generations don’t abruptly start and end, Seemiller said. The dates for when they start and end are fairly arbitrary, so there’s plenty of crossover in traits between students who started college in 2012 and those who started in 2013.

Earlier generations spanned more years than the more recent ones including Generation Z. That’s because technology is changing the context of people’s lives, they said.
Seemiller and Grace brought together data from nearly 300 sources to develop a portrait of Generation Z. Key studies they used were:
  • Generation Z Goes to College study, 2014. Collected data from more than 1,200 first-year students born 1995 or later at 15 public, private, four-year and two-year institutions.
  • Innovations Imperative: Northeastern study, 2014. Studied 1,000+ 16 to 19 year olds.
  • CIRP Freshman Survey, 2014. Collected data on 150,000 first-year Gen Z students.
  • Market Research.
  • Youth research.
Members of Gen Z are “far more complex and dimensional than people give credit for,” Seemiller said. “They’re not just texting.”
In researching the context these new students on campus operate in and their beliefs, Seemiller and Grace identified the following characteristics:
  • Information. These students expect any information they need to be at their fingertips. They don’t have to hope the journal is on the shelf. And if it’s online, they think it must be true.
  • Connection. GenZers are constantly connected. They suffer from FOMO — “fear of missing out.”
  • Creative entrepreneurship. Gen Z students believe that sharing can be revenue generating. They see selling as not just for businesses and want to be their own bosses. They observe examples like Uber, the world’s largest taxi company that owns no vehicles; and Airbnb, the world’s largest accommodations provider that owns no real estate.
  • Disasters and tragedies. The world is a scary place where danger lurks around every corner. With cyberbullying, you can’t even hide behind your own doors.
  • Leadership. Students see more women and people of color in leadership roles, but they know those are still the minority. They believe in reaching for their dreams but being realistic.
  • Social justice. The social movements on equity and equality matter to Gen Z students.
  • Finances. Budget cuts are a reality for these students. Knowing that getting a good job might not be easy, they are financially conservative.
Other findings include:
  • Personal Characteristics. GenZers perceive a big gap between their own characteristics and those of their peers. “They think pretty highly of themselves but not as much of their peers,” Grace said. For example, 85 percent of them said they are loyal, but they perceived only 10 percent of their peers as loyal. About 80 percent said they were thoughtful, but they said only about 15 percent of their peers were thoughtful.
  • Motivation. GenZers are strongly motivated by relationships: 75 percent don’t want to let others down, and 75 percent want to make a difference for someone. They are also motivated by passion, with 75 percent saying they would advocate for something they believe in. And they are motivated by rewards: 74 percent are motivated by an opportunity for advancement, and 74 percent are motivated by the possibility of receiving credit. But they are not motivated by validation from others or by money.
  • Religion. GenZers participation in religion is up compared with previous generations. When asked about spirituality, 47 percent said they were religious, and an additional 31 percent said they were spiritual but not religious. Church attendance is also up during young adulthood, with 41 percent saying they attend weekly religious services, compared with 18 percent of Millenials at the same ages, 21 percent of Generation X, and 26 percent of Baby Boomers.
  • Political leaning. GenZers tend to be socially liberal but moderate or conservative financially.
  • Attitude about the future. Most Gen Zers — 60 percent — are optimistic about their futures. That’s a decline from Millennials, among whom 89 percent were optimistic about their future.
  • Technology. GenZers spend almost every waking moment on technology and prefer multitasking across up to five screens. But their favorite form of communication is in person. They prefer texting over email and phone.
  • Role Models. GenZer’s top role models are their parents. Among those surveyed, 69 percent named their parents as role models, compared with 54 percent for Millennials and 29 percent for GenX. College officials are used to helicopter parents, Seemiller said. But now the parents are co-pilots. That will impact how campuses conduct parent and family programs, she said. Parents need to be not just appeased but included.
Prepare for Gen Z learning preferences

GenZ students prefer certain types of learning, Grace said. They like:
  • Learning that is practical.
  • Facilitated learning.
  • Independent work.
  • Solo work that leads to group work.
  • Setting their own pace.
  • Self-reflection.
They do not prefer:
  • An information dump.
  • Group work only.
  • Creative or imaginative processes. Their K-12 schools had declining arts and music programs, Grace said. The students entering college are very solutions oriented. For example, they want to address homelessness down the street.
They like their learning environments to be social. They want to be around others but not work with them. The environment should promote hands-on learning. GenZers don’t like being lectured to three times a week when they can probably find the information online, Grace said. Instead, they like to work at their own pace and use class time to connect with peers and their professor.

The physical space for studying should be quiet and clean, and the people in it should be passionate about the same things they are, Grace said.
Higher education cost tops Gen Z concerns
When asked about their major concerns, GenZers top issues, in order, were:

1. The cost of college. Students expressed fear that they will be buried under a lifetime of debt for their educations. Their jobs will never pay enough to cover the debt, and they will not be able to afford to buy a home because of the student debt.
2. Employment. These students were under no illusion they will get a job or keep it. They want to feel passionate about and connected to the work they are doing and wanted to feel that their work is changing the world.
3. Racism. GenZers said that equality is the right thing to do and that racism is terrible. They also wondered why it’s still an issue. “This stuff should have been over with 70 years ago,” one commented.
4. Financial security. Many GenZers have a “save now, buy later” mentality. “You never know what the future holds, so you’d better have money in the bank,” they said.
5. Limitations on personal freedom. GenZers don’t want the government involved in their lives, whether the issue is gun ownership, abortion or euthanasia. But they do want the government to spend money on education.

Consider the context of Generation Z

What does the world look like to members of Generation Z? Corey Seemiller, assistant professor of leadership studies at Wright State University; and Meghan Grace, new member orientation director for Sigma Phi Epsilon, said to consider the following:
  • Eminem and LL Cool J could show up at parents’weekend.
  • Kevin Bacon has always maintained six degrees of separation in the cinematic world.
  • Their parents’ car CD player is soooo ancient and embarrassing.
  • They have probably never used Netscape as their web browser.
  • “Press pound” on the phone is now translated as “hit hashtag.”
  • With GPS, they have never needed directions to get someplace — just an address.
  • They have never served in the military under Don’t ask, Don’t Tell.
  • Two presidents have primarily defined their timelines.
  • For the oldest, 9/11 happened during their initial weeks of kindergarten.
Compare Millennials, GenZ

Generation Z is replacing the Millennial Generation among traditional-aged students. According to Corey Seemiller and Meghan
Grace, the authors of Generation Z Goes to College, the two generations compare as follows:


To learn more about Generation Z Goes to College, visit http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119143454,miniSiteCd-JBHIGHERED,navId-812120.html and http://genzgoestocollege.com.
SCUP Fellows Program
1/19/2017 12:00 AM

The Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) Fellows Program is accepting applications for 2017. The program is designed to build emerging leaders in higher education planning and help them bring their innovative planning ideas and approaches forward to a broader constituency of planners. Two Fellows are selected each year to pursue a higher education planning research project of their choice, and present the outcomes of their project. They receive a one-year SCUP membership, complimentary registration to two annual conferences, two-$500 stipends, and registration to SCUP’s Planning Institute 1, or Planning Institute 2. They are mentored by a SCUP member. Deadline to apply: Jan 31, 2017. Learn more: www.scup.org/2017FellowsProgram
Questions? Please contact Kathy Benton, associate director, strategic alliances, Society for College and University Planning, kathy.benton@scup.org, 734.669.3271.

The Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) Fellows Program is accepting applications for 2017. The program is designed to build emerging leaders in higher education planning and help them bring their innovative planning ideas and approaches forward to a broader constituency of planners. Two Fellows are selected each year to pursue a higher education planning research project of their choice, and present the outcomes of their project. They receive a one-year SCUP membership, complimentary registration to two annual conferences, two-$500 stipends, and registration to SCUP’s Planning Institute 1, or Planning Institute 2. They are mentored by a SCUP member. Deadline to apply: Jan 31, 2017. Learn more: www.scup.org/2017FellowsProgram
Questions? Please contact Kathy Benton, associate director, strategic alliances, Society for College and University Planning, kathy.benton@scup.org, 734.669.3271.

Leadership
1/9/2017 12:00 AM
John F. O'Brien has served as dean of New England Law | Boston since 1988. That makes him the longest continuously serving dean of any law school in the country. And he served as a faculty member and associate dean at New England Law before he became dean.

John F. O'BrienJohn F. O'Brien has served as dean of New England Law | Boston since 1988. That makes him the longest continuously serving dean of any law school in the country. And he served as a faculty member and associate dean at New England Law before he became dean.

O'Brien shared leadership strategies that produce successful results in the long term:

  • Combine deep experience with continuous innovation. New England Law was founded as the first law school in the United States for women. It went coeducational in 1938. O'Brien works to keep the institution on the cutting edge. For example, the school offers unlimited summer fellowships for students that the school pays for. Also, officials created academic centers in the areas of international law, business law, and social responsibility so that students can engage in project-based work with faculty. Plus, the faculty keep the curriculum current with concentrations in fast-growing areas of law. And to help students get a head start on their careers, the school gives students free memberships in the Boston Bar Association.
  • Build a good team, and trust those around you. “A law school is too complex of an organization for a dean to manage every detail,” O'Brien said. Many members of the faculty and staff have years of experience. For example, the associate dean started at New England Law in the 1970s as a faculty secretary. Her ability to troubleshoot led her to become director of financial aid, then registrar and director of admission before becoming associate dean.
  • Create an environment that supports teaching and learning. Let faculty do what they are best at doing, O'Brien said. At New England Law, faculty members created and run the academic centers. An enrichment program promotes diversity and provides support to students of color.Because New England Law is independent, it's possible to really streamline the process if faculty members or others have good ideas, O'Brien said. There's no central administration to deal with, just the board of trustees.

  • Pay close attention to students. They are the school's customers. O'Brien hosts regular “pizza with the dean” sessions where he hears students' ideas and concerns. He also meets with the student bar association and with its president. Students have made helpful suggestions about alternative ways of doing things, O'Brien said.

Consider initiatives that support students, advance institution's success

Initiatives that support the needs of students help your institution enroll them in a competitive market and enhance their success after they graduate. O'Brien has led his school through implementing innovative opportunities, including:

  • Paid summer fellowships. Employers can hire students at no cost to themselves, and students get a jump start on their careers. “The school has always stressed being ready to practice from the day you graduate,” O'Brien said. After their first year, all students are eligible to line up jobs at federal agencies or law firms, and the school pays. Many of the students have been offered jobs for the next summer and after graduation.
  • Generous scholarships. Many scholarships go to students from groups who haven't traditionally studied law. That tradition of expanding access to the legal profession stems from New England Law's founding as the first law school in the United States for women.
  • Academic centers. The Center for Law and Social Responsibility, Center for International Law and Policy, and Center for Business Law allow students to pursue their particular interests while they are still in school. Students are exposed to the various areas in their first year. After that, they are matched up with faculty members in the centers to work on projects. This work helps them understand what they might want to do after they graduate.
  • Connections with top legal minds. Seven U.S. Supreme Court justices, including Chief Justice John Roberts, have visited New England Law, lectured at the school, or taught in summer-abroad programs. O'Brien considers what would attract them on a case-by-case basis. For example, Sandra Day O'Connor has visited a number of times and developed a fondness for the school that grew from its mission for educating women, O'Brien said.

Email John F. O'Brien at jfo@nesl.edu.

Lawsuits and Rulings
8/13/2013 12:00 AM

30+ years of law practice are no substitute for scholarship

Case name: Spaeth v. Georgetown University, No. 11-1376 (ESH) (D.D.C. 05/09/13).

Ruling: The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia granted summary judgment to Georgetown University, dismissing the plaintiff’s age discrimination claims.

Case name: Spaeth v. Georgetown University, No. 11-1376 (ESH) (D.D.C. 05/09/13).

Ruling: The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia granted summary judgment to Georgetown University, dismissing the plaintiff’s age discrimination claims.

What it means: When a plaintiff claims he was not interviewed for a college or university position because of his age, it’s not sufficient to show that the individuals interviewed and hired were younger than he was. He must also show that he had all the qualifications necessary to obtain a tenure-track position.

Summary: Nicholas Spaeth — born in 1950 — attended Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship. He graduated from Stanford Law School in 1977 after serving as a law review editor.

Following law school, he served as North Dakota state attorney general for seven years, as general counsel to several Fortune 500 companies, and as a lawyer in private practice. He also taught constitutional law as an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota Law School from 1980 through 1983.

In 2009, he decided to pursue an academic career. Ultimately, he obtained a non-tenure-track position as a visiting professor of law at the University of Missouri at Columbia for the 2010-2011 school year.

In 2010, Spaeth submitted a resume to an online resume system in which 172 law schools participated because his visiting professor position was only a one-year appointment.

He also wrote to several law schools directly to indicate his interest in being considered for a position.

He did not write directly to Georgetown University because he didn’t think that he wanted to live in Washington, D.C.

Spaeth was invited to preliminary interviews by only two schools and received no job offers.

He then filed a suit against Georgetown, claiming that its failure to interview and hire him violated the Age Discrimination in Employment Act because it ultimately hired three less-qualified candidates who were approximately 25 years younger.

Georgetown filed a motion for summary judgment, arguing that Spaeth’s online résumé did not reveal any interest or experience in producing the kind of original legal research and scholarship that Georgetown and other top-tier law schools required.

Spaeth countered that Georgetown had no written requirement that scholarship weighed heavily — or outweighed — teaching and service.

However, District Judge Ellen Huvelle said that the lack of a written requirement was irrelevant. She said there was no need to put in writing what everyone knew: that scholarship was — for better or worse — one of the overriding concerns among elite law schools in making hiring decisions.

She recognized that Spaeth strongly felt that law students should be taught by practitioners instead of academics. However, she said that he could not dispute that scholarship was indeed a primary focus of law schools when hiring faculty members, and she refused to interfere with the university’s priorities.

Judge Huvelle found that Spaeth did not demonstrate the necessary qualifications for an entry-level tenure-track position at Georgetown because he had no record of scholarly work and had not shown a potential for producing such work in the future.

She granted summary judgment in favor of the university.

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    Joan Hope became editor of Dean & Provost in 2007. She brings years of experience in higher education and journalism to her work. She has taught writing and literature courses for eight years at colleges and universities including Indiana University at Bloomington, Clark University, and Houston Community College
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